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Married Women and the Law of Property in Victorian Ontario (Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History)

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Published by University of Toronto Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Private, property, family law,
  • World history,
  • Property,
  • Law,
  • Women"s Studies - History,
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • Ontario,
  • History: World,
  • Married women,
  • Legal status, laws, etc,
  • Canada - General,
  • Gender & the Law,
  • Law / Legal History,
  • Separate property,
  • 19th century,
  • Legal status, laws, etc.

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages272
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7873760M
ISBN 100802078397
ISBN 109780802078391

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Read - Married Women and the Law of Property in Victorian Ontario: Lori Chambers - desLibris. Married Women and the Law of Property in Victorian Ontario SUPO $ / user X $ Add to cart. Share this book × Copy link. Get this from a library! Married women and property law in Victorian Ontario. [Anne Lorene Chambers; Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History.]. BOOK REVIEW Married Women and Property Law in Victorian Ontario By LORI CHAMBERS (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, )1 x + pages. Married Women and Property Law in Victorian Ontario is essential reading for all those interested in the history of changes to women's rights in Canada. In this well-written monograph, Lori Chambers. Get this from a library! Married Women and the Law of Property in Victorian Ontario.. [Lori Chambers] -- A meticulously researched and revisionist study of the nineteenth-century Ontario's Married Women's Property Acts. They were important landmarks in the legal emancipation of women.

Married Women and the Law of Property in Victorian Ontario|Until this century, married women had no legal right to hold, use, or dispose of property. The Married Women's Property Act (33 & 34 Vict. c) was an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom that allowed married women to be the legal owners of Citation: 33 & 34 Vict. c Apr 06,  · These weaknesses aside, this volume of RCMP records, accompanied by a detailed index, remains an extremely useful tool for researchers. STEVE HEWITT University of Saskatchewan Married Women and Property Law in Victorian Ontario. LORI CHAMBERS. Toronto: University ofToronto Press/Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History Author: Richard H. Chused. These weaknesses aside, this volume of RCMP records, accompanied by a detailed index, remains an extremely useful tool for researchers. STEVE HEWITT University of Saskatchewan Married Women and Property Law in Victorian Ontario. LORI CHAMBERS. Toronto: University ofToronto Press/Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History

The Married Women's Property Act (45 & 46 Vict. c) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that significantly altered English law regarding the property rights of married women, which besides other matters allowed married women to own and control property in their own sinoppazari.comon: 45 & 46 Vict. c Married women and the law of property in nineteenth-century Ontario / by Anne Lorene Chambers. KF C44 Married women and property law in Victorian Ontario / Lori Chambers. KF C Married women and property law in Victorian Ontario. Main Author: Chambers, Lori. This paper reports patterns of property-holding by women and men in late nineteenth century Ontario immediately before and after legislation in and which permitted married women to hold property in their own name. The female-held share of all property and the female share of all owners in the town increased sharply. The gains were made by married women, and even more strongly by. Jan 27,  · There are many misunderstandings about who is a “common law spouse” in Ontario, and what exactly this means. Many people believe that if they are in a common law relationship they have all the same rights that a married spouse has, when in reality they do not.